Slide

Food Porn and Hangovers 2

DISCLAIMER: The sound is a little bit better, still haven’t figured it out quite yet, so bear with me.

Japan:

I love Japanese food, with a passion, there’s something about raw food, rice noodles, weird looking ingredients, seaweed, preserved tofu, etc, that just gets me going. I also like the fact that when i go to a Japanese market or order at a Japanese restaurants, just by voicing out the words, i actually feel like i can speak Japanese.

Okonomiyaki. Oh Oko, why are you so good. This word derives from Okonomi which means “what you like” and yaki meaning “grilled”. What I like grilled? Sounds good to me, count me in! These are savoury pancakes prepared on flat top grills associated to the regions of Kansai and Hiroshima; all the toppings vary depending on the region. Most Okonomiyaki restaurants serve theirs, traditionally with a cabbage based pancake, some fish or shrimp flakes, ground pork, raw eggs some dried seaweed and enough ketchup/mayo to deplete the stocks of McDonalds.

 Japan remains one of the countries in Asia I have yet to discover, I was lucky enough to have a layover in Tokyo one day on my way to Russia. It’s early in the morning (1.30AM) there are bunch of restaurants in the airport and I was in heaven; me and Japanese food are in an intimate relationship. So I see this sign Okonomiyaki, I have no idea what it is, but it smells like sin, so I sit down at the kitchen/bar and order. Even though, I’ve never been into the Japanese cities, this meal alone was able to transport me into them. My variation as follows:

This dish will insure you your happy ending; we make you happy long time… ( I don’t know why I just wrote that)

Oko me good: Leek and Cabbage Okonomiyaki topped with honey-orange glaze barbecue pulled pork ribs, corn on the cob, with Thai style fiery shrimp.

PhotobucketPhotobucket

Prep:

Pork: Take 500 grams of pork ribs, salt and pepper them, boil them in hot water until white foams come out, take them out, place them in a bowl with 2 dashes or Worcestershire sauce, 1 tablespoon of red wine vinegar, 2 tablespoons of yakininu sauce, 1 tablespoon or 2 of barbecue sauce, 1 onion, 1 clove of garlic, 1 tablespoon of honey, juice of 1 orange. (optional: 1 small can of pineapples – juice + chunks). Brown half a diced onion, 1 crushed garlic clove, then add your pork mix, and slow boil for 2 hours, until the liquid reduces. Additionally you can add some rosemary.

Shrimp: Devein 10 shrimp (3-4 per person), place them in a bowl with chopped ginger (enough to coat lightly all your shrimp, 1 big tablespoon of brown sugar, 1 stalk of coriander, 1 stalk of Vietnamese mint (chopped), 2 chillies finely chopped, 1-2 tablespoons of fish sauce, and 1 tablespoon of soy sauce. Additionally you can add some galangal root.

Okonomiyaki (pancake): in a bowl, 1 handful of sliced green beans, 1 handful of chopped nappa cabbage, ½ chopped onion, 1 diced garlic  clove, 1 grated carrot, 1 chopped leek, 1 handful of coriander, 1 big pinch of salt and pepper, 1 ¼  cup of flour, ¾ cup of water, ½ grated Nagaimo (or kamote, or potato, or sweet potato). More salt. Try to find the consistency of a pancake batter by adding more flour to make it thicker and more water if you need it to be more liquid (i’m sorry i suck with measurements).

Cook:

Boil one corn on the cob in salted water. Start with the pancake, cook until a wooden spike comes out clean, brown on both sides. Take your pork from your mixture and grill or fry until caramelized (they should already be very soft from the boiling), if you don’t have a grill and don’t want to lose that flavour, set your oven to broil and cook it there. Take your shrimp and spot fry for 2 minutes until nice and golden/orange, flambee with Grand Marnier.

Plate:

On your plate, place your shrimp on some chopped coriander, or a thai style salad if you want to, placed the pulled pork (removed from the bones) onto your pancake with the corn, you can also drizzle some of the cooking juices on top. For the sauce, simply take a small dipping bowl fill it with soy sauce, add some slivers of ginger and a cut chilli.

Stop. Admire. Eat!

Next week preview: “My family and I used to spend a lot of winters in Canada, more specifically in Montreal, Quebec. Yes, the region that claims it speaks better French than us (Real) French people, don’t even get me started on that… One of the many things they do right though is this little heart attack of a dish served in Styrofoam bowls, usually eaten in the dead of winter after a fresh snowboarding session (…)”


19 COMMENTS

    1. catherinecueto June 6, 2011 at 2:24 am

      this looks good.^^
      wanna try it at home.:)

    Reply
    1. catherinecueto June 6, 2011 at 2:26 am

      WOW!YOU’VE MOVED TO WORDPRESS NA AH!:)) THIS IS AWESOME:) HAHA!:))

    Reply
    1. sergei reyes June 6, 2011 at 12:11 pm

      i absolutely love your blog. Good food, and hey! awesome taste in music. Good job man! Keep it up. I’m watching this blog unfold.

      -Serg from sergeiwrites.

    Reply
    1. sergei reyes June 6, 2011 at 1:39 pm

      oh and audio. i wanted to hear so bad, but thanks for writing it down!! :) this looks delicious!

    Reply
    1. joycel June 7, 2011 at 3:02 pm

      i Love your blog. i’m surprised with the okonomiyaki that you made. tried lots of it here in Japan. i wonder how your okonomiyaki taste like. looks yummy!

    Reply
    1. Charaze Faith June 8, 2011 at 4:47 pm

      Mmmm… heaven on Earth! :-)

    Reply
    1. avs June 9, 2011 at 5:17 am

      looks very yum! may i know what’s the title of the first track on your vid? thanks!

    Reply
    1. Denise June 9, 2011 at 8:07 am

      do you just basically dip all the food (shrimp, pork, pancake, corn) on that sauce in the middle? yum!!!

    Reply
      1. Erwan Heussaff June 10, 2011 at 1:51 am

        do whatever you want with it :) but yes, that’s the gis

      Reply
    1. hazel June 14, 2011 at 3:38 am

      best okonomiyaki is in osaka! i hope you’ll be able to explore japan more (not only on layovers). the food is great, the culture is fascinating and the sights and sounds are incredible. i’m speaking not as a tourist who just visited for a few days but as someone who has lived there for two years. enjoy your okonomiyaki!

    Reply
    1. Belle Role June 30, 2011 at 6:02 pm

      Wow. I’m really impressed. Man, you can cook! (Very well, actually) Did you take cooking lessons or are you self-taught? Your Okonomiyaki plus pulled pork ribs looks savory, by the way. (And I bet it tastes good too!) @.@

    Reply
      1. Erwan Heussaff July 7, 2011 at 1:49 am

        i’ve trained in kitchens, but not in school. Try it! it’s a great comfort.

      Reply
    1. moreandagri July 14, 2011 at 6:47 am

      man what’s the title of the song? great blog, btw!

    Reply
      1. moreandagri July 14, 2011 at 6:48 am

        the one you used for intro

      Reply
      1. Erwan Heussaff July 21, 2011 at 4:05 am

        her space holiday

      Reply
    1. Ellain July 24, 2011 at 2:33 am

      I don’t know how to cook! this helped me a lot and I must say, I feel like a real chef! post other recipes! I so love cooking now! thanks!!!!

    Reply
 

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about THE FAT KID

I gained weight because of a sedentary lifestyle and overly indulging in foods I knew were bad for me, eating out too often, taking the easy route (microwavable dishes) and not caring what went in my body, before I knew it reached 240 lbs. I lost weight through pure dedication, tireless hours of hard work and yes, food. I cooked my way to fitness, making sure to only feed myself tasty well prepared dishes with all the right stuff, the perfect fuel, taking me down to 150lbs. Of course I indulge from time to time, as the fat kid still lurks inside of me; here you will find a little bit of everything for the sole purpose of sharing my passion for food and life.

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